Helping you deliver the highest quality care to your male patients

Many infections can affect men in very different ways than they affect women. We provide a wide range of tests that align with guidelines from leading organizations that are specific to your male patients.

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The insights you need to provide the best care for your patients

Chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis

According to the annual Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance Report, STDs increased for the fifth consecutive year—with nearly 2.5 million combined cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis.1

In the past few years, reported cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis have increased, especially among men:2

  • 26.8% increase in reported cases of chlamydia2
  • 62.2% increase in reported cases of gonorrhea2
  • 74.2% increase in reported cases of syphilis2

Herpes

Genital herpes is common in the United States. More than 1 out of every 6 people aged 14 to 49 years have genital herpes.3

Genital herpes is caused by 2 types of viruses: herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). Oral herpes is usually caused by HSV-1 and can result in cold sores or fever blisters on or around the mouth. Oral herpes caused by HSV-1 can be spread from the mouth to the genitals through oral sex.

HIV

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes AIDS. When a person becomes infected with HIV, the virus attacks and weakens the immune system. In the United States, people who have syphilis, gonorrhea, and herpes often also have HIV, or are more likely to get HIV in the future.4

In 2018, men accounted for 30,691 (81%) of the 37,968 new HIV diagnoses in the United States and dependent areas. Most (86%) new diagnoses among men were attributed to gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men.5

Today’s guidelines say that everyone between the ages of 13 and 64 should get tested for HIV6

In order to increase detection of pharyngeal or rectal infections, strategies must evolve to include more extra-genital screening for higher-risk patients, including: 7

  • Men who have sex with men
  • People with more than 1 sexual partner
  • Transgender people who have sex with men
  • People who have recently had an STI
  • People who use injection drugs
  • People who have sex with a partner who has HIV

HPV

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. 79 million Americans, most in their late teens and early 20s, are infected with HPV.8

Most men who get HPV never develop symptoms and the infection usually goes away completely by itself. However, if HPV does not go away, it can cause genital warts or certain kinds of cancer. Consider testing your male patients who exhibit anything unusual such as warts, or unusual growths, lumps, or sores on the penis, scrotum, anus, mouth, or throat.

Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a silent epidemic in the United States, where an estimated 2.4 million people are living with chronic hepatitis C.9

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention10,11:

  • New hepatitis C cases are 4 times as high as they were 10 years ago
  • The annual rate of reported acute hepatitis C tripled from 2009 to 2018
  • Rates of acute hepatitis C among people of reproductive age are increasing

Guidelines recommend HCV screening for12,13:

  • All adults aged 18 years and older
  • People with recognized conditions or exposures
  • People with ongoing risk factors, including persons who inject drugs (PWID) (routine periodic testing)
  • Any person who requests hepatitis C testing

Mycoplasma genitalium

Mycoplasma genitalium is increasingly recognized as an important sexually transmitted infection (STI), with an estimated prevalence of 1% to 3% in the general population.14

High-risk populations may have a much higher prevalence (up to 24% among men and 16% among women), comparable to that of chlamydia.14

  • Responsible for 30% of persistent or recurrent urethritis in men15
  • Causes up to 20% of nonchlamydial nongonococcal infections in men16
  • Infected patients are 2 times more likely to acquire HIV17

Mycoplasma genitalium infections may go unrecognized, either because infected individuals are asymptomatic or the symptoms are the same as those associated with other infections of the urogenital tract (eg, chlamydia, gonorrhea, or trichomoniasis). Accurate identification of a patient’s Mycoplasma genitalium infection status is critical for effective patient treatment for reproductive disorders.

Gram stain and culture are not clinically feasible methods of detection for Mycoplasma genitalium due to the pathogen’s lack of cell wall18 and fastidious nature.15 NAATs are preferred for detecting Mycoplasma genitalium because this pathogen cannot be visualized under a microscope and is prohibitively difficult to culture.16

A comprehensive test menu for your male patients

Laboratory Screenings

Test name

Test code

CPT Codea

LABORATORY SCREENING

Chlamydia

TEST NAME

Chlamydia trachomatis RNA, TMA, Urogenital

TEST CODE

11361

CPT Codea

87491

TEST NAME

Chlamydia trachomatis RNA, TMA, Rectal

TEST CODE

16505

CPT Codea

87491

TEST NAME

Chlamydia trachomatis RNA, TMA, Throat

TEST CODE

70048

CPT Codea

87491

LABORATORY SCREENING

Gonorrhea

TEST NAME

Neisseria gonorrhoeae RNA, TMA, Urogenital

TEST CODE

11362

CPT Codea

87591

TEST NAME

Neisseria gonorrhoeae RNA, TMA, Rectal

TEST CODE

16504

CPT Codea

87591

TEST NAME

Neisseria gonorrhoeae RNA, TMA, Throat

TEST CODE

70049

CPT Codea

87591

LABORATORY SCREENING

Chlamydia and gonorrhea

TEST NAME

Chlamydia/Neisseria gonorrhoeae RNA, TMA, Urogenital

TEST CODE

11363

CPT Codea

87491, 87591

TEST NAME

Chlamydia/Neisseria gonorrhoeae RNA, TMA, Rectal

TEST CODE

16506

CPT Codea

87491, 87591

TEST NAME

Chlamydia/Neisseria gonorrhoeae RNA, TMA, Throat

TEST CODE

70051

CPT Codea

87491, 87591

LABORATORY SCREENING

Trichomonas vaginalis

TEST NAME

Trichomonas vaginalis RNA, Qualitative TMA, Males

TEST CODE

90801

CPT Codea

87661

LABORATORY SCREENING

Herpes simplex virus 1/2 for lesions

TEST NAME

SureSwab®, Herpes Simplex Virus, Type 1 and 2 mRNA, TMA

TEST CODE

90570

CPT Codea

87529 (x2)

LABORATORY SCREENING

Herpes simplex virus 1/2

TEST NAME

Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and 2 (IgG), Type-Specific Antibodies

TEST CODE

6447

CPT Codea

86695, 86696

LABORATORY SCREENING

Mycoplasma genitalium

TEST NAME

SureSwab®, Mycoplasma genitalium, Real-Time PCR

TEST CODE

91475

CPT Codea

87563

LABORATORY SCREENING

Syphilis

TEST NAME

RPR (Diagnosis) with Reflex to Titer and Confirmatory Testing

TEST CODE

36126

CPT Codea

86592

LABORATORY SCREENING

HIV

TEST NAME

HIV-1/2 Antigen and Antibodies, Fourth Generation, with Reflexes

TEST CODE

91431

CPT Codea

87389

LABORATORY SCREENING

Hepatitis C

TEST NAME

Hepatitis C Antibody with Reflex to HCV, RNA, Quantitative, Real-Time PCR

TEST CODE

8472

CPT Codea

86803

LABORATORY SCREENING

HPV

TEST NAME

HPV mRNA E6/E7, Rectal

TEST CODE

91932

CPT Codea

87624

TEST NAME

HPV mRNA E6/E7, Rectal with Reflex to Genotypes 16, 18/45

TEST CODE

92810

CPT Codea

87624

TEST NAME

HPV Genotypes 16, 18/45, Anal-Rectal

TEST CODE

92807

CPT Codea

87625

LABORATORY SCREENING

Cytology, non-gynecological

TEST NAME

Cytology, Non-Gynecological, Fluid, Washings, Brushings or FNA

TEST CODE

10676

CPT Codea

88104, 88108, 88112, 88160, 88161, 88162, 87207, 88172, 88173, 88305

Components of panels can be ordered separately.

Test codes may vary by location. Please contact your local laboratory for more information.

a The CPT® codes provided are based on American Medical Association guidelines an are for informational purposes only. CPT coding is the sole responsibility of the billing party. Please direct any questions regarding coding to the payer being billed.

​References:

  1. CDC. 2018 STD surveillance report. Updated October 8, 2019. Accessed November 20, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/nchhstp/newsroom/2019/2018-STD-surveillance-report.html
  2. CDC. Sexually transmitted disease surveillance 2016. Published September 2017. Accessed November 20, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/std/stats16/CDC_2016_STDS_Report-for508WebSep21_2017_1644.pdf
  3. CDC. Genital herpes – CDC fact sheet. Updated August 28, 2017. Accessed November 20, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/std/herpes/stdfact-herpes.htm
  4. CDC. STDs and HIV – CDC fact sheet. Updated March 30, 2020. Accessed November 20, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/std/hiv/stdfact-std-hiv.htm
  5. CDC. HIV and men. Updated November 5, 2020. Accessed November 20, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/group/gender/men/
  6. CDC. HIV testing. Updated June 9, 2020. Accessed November 20, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/testing/index.html
  7. CDC. Clinical prevention guidance. Updated June 4, 2015. Accessed October 17, 2017. https://www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/clinical.htm
  8. CDC. Genital HPV infection – fact sheet. Updated August 20, 2019. Accessed November 20, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/std/hpv/stdfact-hpv.htm
  9. Hofmeister MG, Rosenthal EM, Barker LK, et al. Estimating prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in the United States, 2013-2016. Hepatology. 2019;69(3):1020-1031. doi:10.1002/hep.30297
  10. CDC. Dramatic increases in hepatitis C. Updated April 9, 2020. Accessed May 7, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hcv/vitalsigns/index.html
  11. Ryerson AB, Schillie S, Barker LK, et al. Vital signs: newly reported acute and chronic hepatitis c cases—United States, 2009-2018. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2020;69(14):399-404. doi:10.15585/mmwr.mm6914a2
  12. CDC. CDC recommendations for hepatitis C screening among adults—United States, 2020. Updated April 10, 2020. Accessed May 6, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/rr/rr6902a1.htm
  13. US Preventive Services Task Force, Owens DK, Davidson KW, et al. Screening for hepatitis C virus infection in adolescents and adults: US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. JAMA. 2020;323(10):970-975. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.1123
  14. Aptima® Mycoplasma genitalium Assay [package insert]. Hologic Inc.; 2019.
  15. CDC. Emerging issues. Updated June 4, 2015. Accessed November 20, 2019. https://www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/emerging.htm
  16. Workowski KA, Bolan GA, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines, 2015. MMWR Recomm Rep. 2015;64(RR-03):1-137.
  17. Napierala Mavedzenge S, Weiss HA. Association of Mycoplasma genitalium and HIV infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis. AIDS. 2009;23(5):611-620. doi:10.1097/QAD.0b013e328323da3e
  18. Manhart LE, Broad JM, Golden MR. Mycoplasma genitalium: should we treat and how? Clin Infect Dis. 2011;53(S3):S129-S142. doi:10.1093/cid/cir702