Hereditary cancer

Understanding risk is the first step in addressing hereditary cancer

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women in the United States.1 While all women are at risk for getting breast cancer,2 breast cancer in young women is more likely to be hereditary than breast cancer in older women.3

Hereditary cancer comprises about 5%-10% of all cancers4

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Our hereditary cancer solutions help close the gap between the unknown and the path forward

A complete portfolio of hereditary cancer tests, services, and expert analysis from Quest Advanced Oncology helps you understand patient risk and is the first step in our approach to patient care.

Comprehensive and Guideline-Based Hereditary Cancer Panels

Multi-gene panels including genes associated with a broad spectrum of hereditary cancers.

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Cancer-specific panels

Panels that help identify tumor-specific cancers including breast, colorectal, and endocrine.

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Hereditary cancer syndrome panels

Testing available for specific hereditary cancer syndromes such as tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), and others.

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Single-gene and single-site tests

Targeted tests that may help minimize the need for testing unnecessary genes that are unrelated to the current clinical concern or when the family variant is known.

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The importance of the right test at the right time

BRCA-associated breast, ovarian, and pancreatic syndrome is the most common cause of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

Women and men who carry variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are at a higher risk for developing certain types of cancer. These include cancers of the breast, ovary, prostate, and pancreas. There may also be an increased risk for melanoma. Having a variant does not mean your patient has cancer, only that they are at a higher risk for developing cancer.

Lynch syndrome is the most common cause of hereditary colon and uterine cancer

A variant in any of several genes can cause Lynch syndrome. People with a variant in 1 of these genes have a higher risk for some types of cancer, including cancers of the colon, uterus, ovary, and stomach. Although the risk for cancer is increased, not everyone with Lynch syndrome will develop cancer. Knowing if your patients have a variant allows you to take steps to help them reduce the risk of developing cancer.

When you need to know more, you’ll find more at QuestHereditaryCancer.com

Quest Advanced Oncology’s hereditary cancer solutions website includes our complete portfolio of tests and panels, as well as additional professional resources to help address a variety of patient questions and concerns:

  • Understanding results
  • Financial support for patients
  • Frequently asked questions
  • Guides and documents
  • General forms
A quiz to help your patients understand their personal risk

Our guideline-based quiz can help your patients identify whether they have personal or family history that indicates a risk of hereditary cancer.

Lynch syndrome is the most common cause of hereditary colon and uterine cancer

A variant in any of several genes can cause Lynch syndrome. People with a variant in 1 of these genes have a higher risk for some types of cancer, including cancers of the colon, uterus, ovary, and stomach. Although the risk for cancer is increased, not everyone with Lynch syndrome will develop cancer. Knowing if your patients have a variant allows you to take steps to help them reduce the risk of developing cancer.

When you need to know more, you’ll find more at QuestHereditaryCancer.com

Quest Advanced Oncology’s hereditary cancer solutions website includes our complete portfolio of tests and panels, as well as additional professional resources to help address a variety of patient questions and concerns:

  • Understanding results
  • Financial support for patients
  • Frequently asked questions
  • Guides and documents
  • General forms
A quiz to help your patients understand their personal risk

Our guideline-based quiz can help your patients identify whether they have personal or family history that indicates a risk of hereditary cancer.

One of the most experienced clinical diagnostics teams in the industry

Our team of genetic counselors is available to help with test selection and result interpretation to provide clinical insights that can help you and your patients make more informed decisions about their care pathway. Consult with an expert today.

​References:

  1. CDC. Basic information about breast cancer. Reviewed September 14, 2020. Accessed February 2, 2021. https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/basic_info/index.htm
  2. CDC. What are the risk factors for breast cancer? Reviewed September 14, 2020. Accessed February 2, 2021. https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/basic_info/risk_factors.htm
  3. CDC. Hereditary breast cancer and BRCA genes. Reviewed April 5, 2019. Accessed February 2, 2021. https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/young_women/bringyourbrave/hereditary_breast_cancer/index.htm
  4. National Cancer Institute. The genetics of cancer. Updated October 12, 2017. Accessed February 2, 2021. https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/genetics

Image content features models and is intended for illustrative purposes only.